Numbers

You can enter whole and decimal numbers as you would expect. Separators can be included in large numbers like the comma in 10,000 to make numbers easier to read. By default, these thousands separators will be inserted automatically as you type a number.

42 + 12
2.5 - .7
23,000 + 500
54
1.8
23,500

NOTE

To change what character to use as a thousands separator, go to System Preferences > Language & Region and click the Advanced button

NOTE

To change whether separators should be automatically inserted as you type a number, go to Preferences > Editing > Automation

Shortened Notation

Large and small numbers can be tedious to type, so Figures includes a few ways to make this easier. You can use common names for these numbers like million or billion, called cardinal names. You can also use a metric symbol after the number as a shortcut. For example, 5k is the same as 5,000.

20 million × 3
500 tenths + 1 tenth
5k + 5 hundred
2M meters
5T + 200G
5 mega
5M
60 million
50.1
5,500
2 million m
5.2 trillion
5
5 million

NOTE

These examples and the table below use short cardinal names (most common). Figures also supports long cardinal names if you prefer. Go to Preferences > Format > Region to change which scale to use.

Here are the cardinal names and prefixes supported by Figures:

Cardinal nameMetric prefixSymbolValue
septillionyottaY10²⁴
sextillionzettaZ10²¹
quintillionexaE10¹⁸
quadrillionpetaP10¹⁵
trillionteraT10¹²
billiongigaG10⁹
millionmegaM10⁶
thousandkilok10³
hundred10²
tenth10⁻¹
hundredth10⁻²
thousandth10⁻³
millionthmicroμ10⁻⁶
billionthnanon10⁻⁹
trillionthpicop10⁻¹²
quadrillionthfemtof10⁻¹⁵
quintillionthattoa10⁻¹⁸
sextillionthzeptoz10⁻²¹
septillionthyoctoy10⁻²⁴

NOTE

Some metric symbols near zero aren't supported because they're uncommon and have conflicts. For example, the symbol for thousandth is m which could be confused with the symbol for meters.

NOTE

Metric prefix names like kilo and micro are used with units to change their scale (e.g. kilometers or microliters). They're included here to show what the symbols stand for, but they can't be used with numbers by themselves. Use the symbol instead. See Units for more on using metric prefixes.

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